Monthly Archives: November 2012

Bombtastic bumblebees

I am a honeybee beekeeper, but the entire spectrum of pollinators fascinates me (this is the driving force behind Runamuk’s message of pollinator conservation).  Bumblebees are particularly interesting.  Maine is fortunate to have a large diversity of bumbles, like the Orange-Banded and the Rusty-Patch bumblebee.  Several species have gone extinct in states southwards, and while pollinators are becoming more and… Read more »

Runamuk at the Farm Service Agency

beehive in summer

Now that we have the agreement of Keith’s parents to have a portion of the family’s acreage signed over to us for Runamuk, I’ve been plowing along trying to finalize the details of the arrangement, while also exploring possible avenues for financing.  In order for Runamuk to be a profitable and self-sustaining business we need to make the leap from… Read more »

A Home for Runamuk

I am ecstatic–I am ridiculously exuberant and utterly over-joyed.  We have a home for Runamuk–a place where we will be able to expand our business and our efforts to lead a more self-sustaining life.  A place where we can truly be ourselves. It is the old Burns-family farm-land, just five miles outside of Anson on Rt 158-west.  This is the… Read more »

Good news for next years’ honey

This has been an exciting year for the Runamuk apiary, we were able to expand from two to six hives throughout the summer.  My new-found partnership with Medicine Hill in Starks gave me the chance to increase the number of colonies, and I seized the opportunity with both hands.  And I am pleased to announce that next year we will… Read more »

Women’s Work

Samantha Burns   November 5, 2012   1 Comment on Women’s Work
women in the kitchen

I think sometimes we don’t realize that it wasn’t very long ago that women weren’t encouraged to participate in what was considered a man’s world.  Up until the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries women–especially upperclass women–were generally constrained to the drawing room, where they were expected to occupy themselves with more “genteel” activities, such as needlework, music, and sketching…. Read more »