Garden Cover-Cropping at Runamuk

garden cover cropping

Last week was all about cover-cropping the garden here at Runamuk. The chickens had completed their work and I had my new broadfork, along with some seed to put down; there’s something particularly intimate and romantic about working soil, so I was especially jacked up for the project.

garden cover cropAside from the continued focus on the Runamuk apiary, getting the chickens established and prepping the garden for next year are my main goals this first season at the Hive House. Above all else, I’m concerned with the long-term agroecology of my new farm. Because we are all connected on this planet, and because healthy soils are fundamental to the overall profitability and sustainability of my farm, I’ve made it my priority to start with the soil and work my way up.

A Word About “Agroecology”

Agroecology is the science of applying ecological concepts and principles to the design, development, and management of sustainable agriculture systems.

The agroecologist views any farming system primarily with an ecologist’s eye; that is, it is not firstly economic (created for commodity and profit), nor industrial (modeled after a factory). Agroecologists do not unanimously oppose technology or inputs in agriculture, but instead they assess how, when, and if technology can be used in conjunction with the natural, social and human assets.

This method of agriculture requires a deeper understanding of the complex long-term interactions among resources, people and the environment. Since a love for nature and my fellow man is at the heart of Runamuk, this is how I choose to run my farm.

Prepping the Soil for a Cover-Crop

While there is indeed an existing garden─approximately 25 feet by 80─it was only growing weeds when we arrived at the end of June. I put the chickens on the plot to let them do the work for me, and in 5 short weeks they managed to eliminate the weeds entirely, exposing bare ground for cultivation. They really did an amazing job, and─as an added benefit, the patch got fertilized.

garden when we arrived
This is what the garden looked like when we first arrived at our new #foreverfarm.
chickens working the garden
Here are the chickens at work on the garden.
chicken prepped garden
Once the ground was exposed I moved the chickens over and the soil could be prepped for cover-cropping.

Up til this point I’d only shuffled the fencing along; moving the chicken tractors and the fencing to an entirely new spot while still keeping the birds inside was a little challenging, but I got it all in the end─without any shenanigans, I might add. I’ve put them on a section of earth just next door to the original plot, which I’ve dubbed “The Garden Adjacent”, with the intention of expanding the garden to double the size.

Once I had the chickens off the garden, I eagerly took up my new broadfork and set to work.

broadforkI’ve always loved digging in the dirt. Love love LOVE it! The manual labor, the smell of the earth, the glimpse of microbial life beneath the soil-surface. And I’ve always been particularly partial to my spading fork. The broadfork is simply a larger version─with TWO handles─and easier on my back and body to use. Even still, it took a bit to really get the hang of using the broadfork, and to develop a rhythm with it.

Now─I’m in pretty decent shape for my (nearly) 38 years, but the broadfork offers a really great full-body workout and it turns out that I just couldn’t fork that garden continuously for the 10 hours it took me to complete the job. On Sunday I did 4 hours, then I had to take time off from Johnny’s to get the forking done before the rain that was forecasted for Wednesday. I left the office early on Monday, forked the garden til it was too dark to see, and then was back at it come sun-up Tuesday morning and went to work late that day. Thankfully this is a slow time of year in the Call Center, and my supervisor and colleagues there can allow me some flexibility.

Peas-and-Oats

johnny's peas and oats mix
The peas-and-oats cover-crop mix from Johnny’s Selected Seeds.

Once the cultivation with the broadfork was complete, I happily I brought out the seed I’d bought to cover the garden with. I went with Johnny’s peas-and-oats mix because it’s a super easy to manage cover-crop. The peas─like any legume─help to fix nitrogen in the soil, and the oats serve as a nurse crop, sheltering the seed during germination and then offering crop support for the pea plants. Both are annuals and will be killed this fall by the first hard frost we get, and if I leave the plant residue on the plot it will provide a great mulch layer for my new garden.

I followed Johnny’s recommended sowing rate of 5lbs/1000sq.ft. for the peas-and-oats and bought (2) 5-pound sacks to do that 2,000sq.ft section of earth, along with a package of inoculant.

Question: What is inoculant? and do you really need it?

garden combination incoluant
Garden Combination Inoculant─good for ALL legume-family crops.

This is something we are frequently asked in the Call Center at Johnny’s Selected Seeds. What I tell folks is that it’s not the end of the world if you don’t inoculate your legumes; you’ll still get a crop of peas or beans, or whatever it is. Inoculant is simply a packet full of microorganisms that are specific to legume-family plants, which aid in the legume’s nitrogen-fixing abilities. Personally however, I’ve always felt that anything I could do to help the little guys in the soil do their work of facilitating the availability of nutrients and water for my plants is worth the extra $5 and an extra step. But that’s just me; you’ll have to make that call for yourself.

To apply the inoculant I simply took a pail, dumped the first 5-pound sack of seed into it and added half the contents from the package of inoculant. I stirred the seed around with my hand (it’s not harmful in the least), seeking to ensure that all of the seed was evenly coated with the dark powdery inoculant.

Seeding the Garden for a Cover-Crop

It just happened to take 16 passes up and down the garden with the broadfork to complete this first half of our new garden, so it was easy to plan how I would walk down through the plot with the seed and hopefully ration it so that I had enough to do the entire space. I knew Johnny’s said I’d bought enough to do the job, but I also know from experience that when sowing by hand it’s easy to sow too heavy, and then you run out of seed before you cover the whole plot.

And even with my experience and careful planning, I was still too heavy-handed with the first half of the peas-and-oats mix. I found myself rifling through my seed-stash looking for something I could mix with the second half to stretch it out so that I could get the rest of the garden cover-cropped. Lucky for me I work at a seed-company and have access to “up-for-grabs” seeds; my “seed-stash” is sick…no, seriously─I have a problem, lol.

dwarf essex rape via johnnys selected seeds
Dwarf Essex Rape cover-crop; photo courtesy Johnny’s Selected Seeds.

I found a 10-pound sack of Dwarf Essex Rape seed; score! Rape is a member of the brassica-family and somewhat cold-tolerant, which is really ideal because sometimes we can have several more weeks of growing season after that initial killing frost, so this plant will linger into the fall, but still won’t survive our Maine winter so I won’t have to worry about tilling anything under next spring. I mixed some of this with my remaining peas-and-oats, added the rest of the inoculant, and then managed to finish seeding the garden.

Why Not Just Till it Under?

One of Runamuk’s Instagram followers has asked why I’ve done all this work by hand rather than simply taking a rototiller and tilling the plot under? Perhaps you were wondering too?

Certainly that would have been a quicker alternative and I wouldn’t have been so sore afterwards, lol. However, as an agroecologist I’m concerned for the organisms living in the soil and the impact that tilling would have on them. Tilling destroys their homes and populations. I want to encourage their numbers, help them thrive and aid them in their work so they will in turn aid me in my work: building a farm that not only supports it’s farmer, but which also works in tandem with nature, even helping nature.

That being said, I’m not necessarily opposed to tilling; it has it’s place. If I were facing heavily compacted clay soil I would have brought in a tiller, but as it is, the soil here is a nice sandy loam and this spot has been cultivated for years so I didn’t feel the plot really warranted tilling. The soil was workable with the broadfork, and I am strong and capable. I enjoy the work, and I take pride in knowing I’m doing my best to work with the natural forces in play all around me. So I did it by hand and I feel really good about that.

So Satisfying

broadforking at sunset long shadowBy the time I was on my second cup of coffee Wednesday morning, it was drizzling outside and my cover-crop was being watered in. The whole project was so immensely satisfying: clearing the garden with just the chickens, investing in the broadfork, using it to work the soil, and laying down that precious cover-crop seed─the whole experience was really very intrinsically rewarding to me. And that’s why I’m a farmer: because its fulfilling, because I enjoy it, and because I feel called to do this work and live this life. Thanks for following along!

What are your thoughts on cover-cropping? Have you ever tried it? Or, how do you feel about the notion of agroecology??? Leave a comment below to share with the readership so we can all learn together!

Jacked On Farming

Since closing on the Hive House nearly 2 months ago I’ve been jacked on farming. There’s so much to be done, and so many things I want to do! Farming is a drug I just can’t get enough of. Each morning I awaken eager for the day ahead, and for the chores and projects I will accomplish in the name of my farm. I am bound to this one small piece of Earth for the rest of my life, farm steward at 344 School Street in the remote western Maine village of New Portland. Everything I do now is for Runamuk, and for my kids to some day have this amazing legacy to be proud of.

I’m all jacked up on farming; it’s an energy that floods through my veins, a mixture of excitement, anxiety, and elation. I’m eager to get Runamuk established here, to begin shaping the conservation farm I’ve so long envisioned. I’ve held onto that dream all these years, feeding it gingerly as you would a flickering campfire that might be snuffed out by the next gust of wind. I’ve protected and nurtured it, and now─with my #foreverfarm beneath me, that dream is burning stronger than ever inside me, and  it’s ready to burst into a raging conflagration.

There’s a sense of romance about the union too, that stimulates me. She is wooing me, this piece of land; with every caress of the wind, and every waft of pungent earthy soil that’s kicked up by the broadfork. I find myself sometimes just standing there gazing out across the field at Mt.Abram, or taking in the tall pines across from the garden, or imagining bird-families taking up residence in the weathered old birdhouses that stand as sentries all about the property. With every blazing sunset and each booming thunderstorm─this farm is seducing this farmer.

It’s a powerful feeling─to be steward of this special piece of Earth─and every time I think about the journey that brought me here, I am filled with humility and this incredibly profound sense of gratitude. I am just so damned grateful to be here, doing this work, here on this beautiful property─and that feeling fills me up, driving me on. Runamuk will be the conservation farm I promised, if only to give back that which I’ve been given.

Oh yes, I’m all kinds of jacked up: high on farming and high on this farm. Runamuk is settling in, there are chickens and bees on the property, various workspaces are emerging, the garden is in the process of being cultivated, and I’m beginning to see how my plans for a pollinator conservation farm can take shape here. These next few years will be big years for Runamuk; stay tuned folks, cause this is gonna be good!

The Chickens Have Landed!

runamuk chicken tractors

Just over 2 weeks since Closing and I was finally able to bring the chicken flock to the Hive House. There was an unexpected kink in my moving plans that delayed their arrival and sent me prematurely into a construction project that I hadn’t entirely prepared for. The ending result was a pair of twin chicken tractors and the Runamuk flock set up on the garden at our new #foreverfarm location.

chicken tractors on pasture
The finished product: twin chicken tractors housing a total of 55 birds on the garden site.

Change in Plans

It was the nature of this particular real estate transaction that I did not have the opportunity to walk the property at leisure with an analytical eye before I bought it. Up until the day I came to the Hive House as it’s new owner, all I had to go by to prepare Runamuk and my family for the move were the pictures from the real estate listing, and Google Earth images. It wasn’t until I could tour the facilities and the land on my own that I could really take stock of the property’s assets and weaknesses.

Originally the plan had been to convert one of the barn stalls into a winter coop-space that would house the flock until after the dust settled on the #GreatFarmMove when I could then construct moveable chicken tractors to get the birds out on pasture. I had hoped to just put up a few roosts and cut a pop-hole in the back wall of the barn that would lead the chickens into a fenced yard. This space would house them through the winter, with the addition of a hoop-house off the back of the building. However, when I surveyed the barn at length for the first time I realized that was not going to work.

What I found in that back corner stall were the remnants of a dairy trough, and above that-on three walls were broad shelves where the previous owners had housed various sporting gear. It would have been challenging for me to try to take down the shelving to put up roosts and nesting boxes, but the real clincher was what lay on the outside of the back corner of the barn.

The first issue was that the entire back wall of the barn had been sheathed in sheet metal; I would have to cut into it if I intended to have a pop-hole. Secondly, the bug shack is right off that corner of the barn, with a very lovely spruce tree growing alongside it─directly in the path of my would-be hoop-house. And 3rd: there’s a pop-up garage sitting flush alongside the back of the barn.

Looking around for a more suitable spot, I decided upon the lean-to on the garage as winter coop housing for the chickens. It’s not completely enclosed, but there’s a back wall and a good roof, with solid posts and beams supporting it. Formerly this space had housed the previous owner’s snowblower and yard equipment. That would be a bigger project than the chicken tractors however, and since I want to be able to house the chickens on pasture through the remainder of the season anyway, I opted to focus on those first so I could get the birds moved over as soon as possible.

The Chicken Tractor Project

There are many different styles of chicken tractor out there; Joel Salatin has had great success with his set up, and I really like the chicksaw concept, but with my preference to use PVC in construction John Suscovich’s system was easier to adapt to meet Runamuk’s needs. With that in mind I set out to create a chicken tractor that would be small and light enough that I could move it across the pasture on my own, provides a minimum of 50-feet of roost space for Runamuk’s 50 birds, which would also offer maximum amount of nesting space without weighing the overall structure down too much.

chicken tractor twin construction
To have a moveable coop that was both small enough that I could move it alone, and could also house the entire flock comfortably, I needed not one, but TWO coops.

Striving to keep the overall structure as light as possible, I used 2x4s for the frame, 2x3s for the vertical roost supports, and 1x3s for the horizontal roosts as well as for the framing on the nesting boxes.

Half-inch schedule 40 grey PVC (which I prefer because it is UV resistant and does not degrade in the sun as quickly as the white PCV) made up my hoops, and I covered the exterior with chick-wire that was fastened to the hoops with zip-ties or stapled to the wooden frame with a light-duty staple gun.

chicken tractor nesting boxes
Nesting boxes along the length of the coop on either side allows 14 feet of nesting space per coop.

The nesting boxes hang off the sides of the coop, made up of quarter-inch exterior sheathing and this lightweight but weather-resistant material I found in the garden and cut up to serve as a flap for easy egg-collection.

chicken tractor backside
I’m using one set of wheels between the 2 coops.

The ending result was a pair of twin hoop-coop style moveable chicken tractors, each with 14 feet of nesting space and 35 feet of roost space. With tires on the back end I can use my utility dolly to hook onto the front and roll the coop forward to a new location.

Lessons in Preparation

Normally I’m extremely fastidious about preparation when it comes to construction projects, dedicating plenty of time to designing a plan and supply list. This time I was caught by surprise. When I realized I was going to have to stop everything two-thirds of the way through my #GreatFarmMove to construct housing for the flock, I merely put a sketch on paper with some dimensions and jotted down a supply list along the side of the page.

As a result of my lack of planning, there were a couple things I had overlooked and when I had to run for more supplies it was a bit of a trek from my new location in New Portland to the nearest lumber yard or hardware store in Madison. Having to run for materials or parts eats up a lot of time when living so remotely, and the chicken tractor project was a valuable lesson in preparation for life at the Hive House.

learning to use a power saw
I am now proficient with my Ryobi power saw!

I also had to learn how to use a power saw. I’ve traditionally used a simple handsaw for most construction, and asked the man in my life to do any bigger cuts that required the use of power saws. Big whirling blades of death frighten me and I’ve avoided confronting those fears, preferring smaller power tools like my drill, and my weed-whacker. However this was a bigger project with a lot of cuts and I am the man in my life now, so I decided it was time to learn this skill. I started small, with a battery-powered ryobi circular saw─it’s probably the smallest and cutest circular saw out there lol─so it was less threatening than most saws.

The Chickens Have Landed at the Hive House!

The chicken tractors are finished now, and the chickens have landed at the hive house. I have just a few more car loads this week to finish up the moving and then I think I can start unpacking lol. It feels really great to have the work-spaces that Runamuk needs─so far I’ve assembled bee equipment in the barn, wrapped soap in the upstairs craft room, and celebrated with friends in the Bug Shack. I wake up each day eager to get to the work that this farm provides me, and I go to bed each night sore, but happy. I am focused on the task at hand: growing this farm and ensuring it’s longevity. Every day is an adventure, and life is good.

Thanks for reading! Subscribe by email to receive the latest from Runamuk directly to your in-box, or follow @runamukacres on Twitter or Instagram for a behind the scenes look at life on this bee-friendly farm!

Strawberries on the GreenStalk

greenstalk project

This season my 11 year old son is growing strawberries on the GreenStalk garden planter for our family. It’s important to me to teach my children how to produce their own food, and the GreenStalk tower planter is a fun, and easy to use introduction to growing.

greenstalk projectFood Production is Essential

My boys are 15 and 11 now. They’ve been around the garden their entire lives, and I’ve made it a point to include them  in food-related chores to expose them to real food and where that food comes from─how it’s grown, prepared and cooked. Now that they’re getting older though, I want food production to be a bigger part of their lives─a necessary part of every-day life, like brushing your teeth─but more rewarding.

I believe that feeding ourselves and the people we care about is an essential component to life and living. Food and cooking makes us who we are: feeding families, traditions and every culture on the face of the planet. And yet studies show that many people don’t even know how to cook the variety of foods available to them; in America people spend just 6.5 hours per week prepping meals─compared to 13.2 and 13.1 hours spent on the task in India and the Ukraine.

Since the advent of the industrialized food system, we’ve increasingly allowed food production to be outsourced and as a result we’ve witnessed a tragic loss of skills, tradition and community, that goes hand in hand with food. I want to nurture those skills, preserve traditions and support the community I love and serve, and so I start with myself and with my own home. Be the change you want to see in the world, right?

Note: To learn more about our food system check out this article I wrote a while back: Vote With Your Fork to Save our Broken Food System.

The GreenStalk Strawberry Project

To step-up the level of responsibility I’m asking from my sons William (15) and BraeTek (11 – pronounced: Bray-tek), I decided to give them more authority over the food production. This year they each have a garden project geared toward their own individual interests. William loves to eat dill pickles, so he’ll be growing a “Pickle Garden” and learning to make pickled foods: dill pickles, dilly beans, pickled beets, etc. while BraeTek wanted to grow raspberries and blackberries to make into smoothies.

With Runamuk’s impending #foreverfarm purchase and the #GreatFarmMove #finalchapter just weeks away, I initially thought I would have to steer BraeTek in another direction─putting in perennial berry plants is not on the list for this year. However, when Ashley Skeen with GreenStalk Gardens invited me to trial their vertical garden planter and participate in their affiliate program, I saw it as an opportunity for BraeTek to be able to grow berries even in the face of the upcoming transition. I told Ashley I was “in” and ordered 25 units of Seascape bare-root strawberry plants from Johnny’s Selected Seeds─a variety that performs well in containers.

The GreenStalk is a series of 4 or 5 planters that are stackable, so it doesn’t take up much space. It has a unique system designed to conserve water, with a slow-drip method that applies the water directly to the roots of your plants. The planters are made of BPA-free plastic right here in the USA, and are very rugged, gauranteed to last at least 5 years.

Note: Did I mention GreenStalk has issued me a coupon code to share with Runamuk readers??? Get $10 off your very own GreenStalk! Click on the GreenStalk image in the sidebar to learn more!

Preparing the GreenStalk

Using the GreenStalk is super easy. Together BraeTek and I filled the 4 tiers with potting mix─as a rule I use “ProMix”, which I buy annually as a bale at my local Campbell’s True Value hardware and garden center in Madison, Maine. It’s a mix of peat moss, vermiculite and mycorrhyzae that has always served me well.

growing with greenstalk
BraeTek and I filled the four tiers with potting soil.

Add Fertilizer

Because the ProMix does not contain any added fertilizers we added our own to the planters. I have rabbit manure on hand, so I filled a bucket with that and let BraeTek apply a thick layer over the potting mix, and then mixed it into the top six inches of soil.

rabbit poop
Add a healthy helping of rabbit-poop fertilizer!

Make it Fun!

Life is hard enough. I’m a big advocate for looking for the light, and for sharing love and positivity whenever and wherever you can. Make it fun and savor the moment because ultimately this is your life and you only get one. Make it a good one.

greenstalk project with braetek
Crack some jokes along the way!

Planting!

GreenStalk sent a guide along with the planter offering recommendations on how many plants to put in each pocket. I helped BraeTek put one strawberry plant in each of the 6 pockets on all 4 tiers.

greenstalk planting
Then add the strawberry plants!

Stack ’em Up!

Once we had the 4 tiers filled, fertilized and planted I stacked them up. The individual tiers were not super heavy, and they lock easily into place, with a reservoir in between each level, and a reservoir on top. These reservoirs are what make watering the GreenStalk so easy! Check out this page on the GreenStalk website to see a fun animation of how their unique watering system works!

greenstalk easy watering
BraeTek liked watering the tower!

Strawberries Outside the Front Door

That’s all there was to it, folks─I now have a tower of strawberry plants growing outside the front door. I had hoped to be moved before BraeTek’s strawberries came, but with the delay in Closing that wasn’t possible; Ashley at GreenStalk however, was kind enough to send along one of their custom “GreenStalk Movers” to help with the transition. I’ll be sure to take a couple pictures of that in-use during the #GreatFarmMove and post them to Runamuk’s Instagram feed, but there will be subsequent updates on our GreenStalk Strawberry Project as well, so check back over the course of the summer for more about this unique vertical growing system!

Food Adds Spice to Life

I totally believe that there are certain things that are the “Spice of Life”. I imagine them in little glass spice jars, neatly labeled on a rack in the proverbial kitchen of your life, and you can add these “spices” to your life to add flavor, value and meaning to your existence. Spices like music, friendship, family, experiences, nature…and food.

Food not only has the power to feed us, but also to connect us. Food draws us together─it fosters love and a sense of community. Through food we are able to nurture ourselves and those we care about. We all have powerful memories of being cooked for, and those acts of generosity and love run deep within us.

Personally, even though it’s more work to do it myself, I don’t want to allow the Industry to provide all of my food for me. I don’t like the ingredients they have to use to be able to keep their food products on the shelves at the store. I don’t agree with the values the industry supports and I oppose many of their methods. It’s a small act of resistance, but I’d rather give the Food Industry as little of my money as possible, and I choose to vote with my fork for food that doesn’t make me feel guilty to eat.

What’s more, growing and cooking my own food adds meaning and spice to my life that I might otherwise miss out on. Food allows me to express my love─I can express my love for nature by growing food using methods that are friendly to the Earth. By cooking real, wholesome food I can shower my family with love, and nurture relationships and traditions, even honor loved ones who have passed on. And food is universal, it can extend beyond the home and I can express my love for extended family, friends, and even my community by sharing food.

Food is a powerful ingredient in the “Spice of Life” cabinet. Don’t outsource it to Industry, because ultimately it’s your life that loses flavor. It’s never to late to learn to cook a new dish, or to learn how to grow your own strawberries. Join me and start today!

Feel free to share your thoughts, questions and feedback regarding the GreenStalk and food as a “Spice of Life” in the Comments section below! We can all learn together! Be sure to follow Runamuk on Instagram and Twitter for daily behind-the-scenes updates from the farm!

Official Closing Date

At long last I have an Official Closing Date on my #foreverfarm! We have overcome every hurdle─Runamuk and I, and this property I’ve affectionately dubbed “the Hive House”─in order to come together to form this union between farmer and farm. There’s no going back now; it’s only a matter of time before I finally have a permanent location for my farm and family.

Everything that I am, and everything that I have ever done in my life, has been leading me to this moment. It has taken everything I have to get here─years and years of hard work, determination, and sacrifice. Now I am exhausted from my long journey, and I’ve reached the end of my proverbial rope.

This week, my agent at the FSA, Nathan informed me that the title search had come back clear and as such has been approved. They’ve ordered the title insurance─the last piece of the FSA loan puzzle. Nathan was about to schedule Closing for next week, when we discovered an unexpected speed bump.

beeswax soap at amrket
Some of Runamuk’s beeswax soap on display at the Madison Farmers’ Market.

Up til now we’d been operating under the impression that Closing would happen just as soon as all of the hurdles had been overcome and the paperwork could be ready. However, to allow enough time for the FSA’s interminable loan process we’d sited on the Sale Contract that Closing would occur on or before June 29th. Since this was my second time through the process, Nathan has been pushing my paperwork through as quickly as he could, but we learned this week that the Sellers will not be ready to Close before the June 29 deadline.

In order to Close early both parties have to agree, and that is not going to happen in this case.

I was shocked. I had not entertained the notion that it could possibly take til the end of June to resolve this part of my life and move onto the next. What’s more, it’s become increasingly difficult to live and farm under my present circumstances. These temporary lodgings have served their purpose─this tiny trailerstead in the backwoods of central Maine has been the stepping stone I needed to make Runamuk’s farm-purchase happen─but I was aghast at having to live and farm 5 more weeks under these conditions.

Runamuk needs the proper infrastructure to be able to function successfully. I need a proper home for myself and my family, and space to do my own thing. In these temporary conditions I’m lacking space to assemble and store hive equipment, I have no place to dry the herbs used to make Runamuk’s various beeswax salves, there isn’t space to extract the remaining honey that I have still waiting in combs from last fall’s harvest, and I am lacking pasture to move my new pullets onto so they’re eating way more of that expensive organic grain than they otherwise would be.

What’s more, while I was able to plant my potatoes, onions, and garlic at this temporary location, I was intending to plant the remainder of my garden at the Hive House. With a Closing Date of June 29th I’ll have to abandon many of the full-season crops I typically plant: the tomatoes and winter squashes etc, which directly impacts my ability to produce food to store to see my family though the winter.

All of this will affect my farm-income and I’m concerned about being able to meet the financial projections I forecasted for the FSA when I assembled my paperwork for this loan. Unfortunately there’s really nothing to be done for it. Legally the Sellers are within their rights. If you look at it from their perspective, you can imagine what it might be like to have to say goodbye to the home they’ve known their entire adult lives. I’m sure that’s not easy either.

limited availability
Signage at farmers’ market explaining the sparseness of Runamuk’s booth; currently I’m out of honey, and since the new flock has not yet started laying, I don’t have eggs either.

Since there’s nothing to be done for it, I’ve accepted this year for what it is─a year of transition for Runamuk. I’ve decided to take it easy on myself; buying a farm through the FSA is a daunting prospect even under the best of circumstances. Moving a farm is challenging for any farmer, and trying to continue farming while relocating your operation is an ambitious proposition for even the best of us. I’m doing good just to be at market, to still be making soap at all, and to be working with bees even as a landless farmer.

I’m incredibly stressed and anxious about the whole thing, and these last few weeks I’ve just been trying to hold on til Closing. When I learned I would have to wait 5 more weeks I wasn’t sure I could make it. But when I posted to my facebook community expressing my concerns, a wise friend (thank you Janet!) quoted Franklin D. Roosevelt:

tie a knotIt brings to mind this mental image of myself clinging to the knot at the end of my rope, hanging on for dear life while the Journey finds me whipping in the wind and rains like a ragdoll. And I just keep telling myself “Don’t let go!”

Come June 29th the Hive House will be mine and Runamuk will finally have a #foreverfarm. It’s a huge relief to know that everything is a GO─nothing can stop this sale now. If I can just tough it out a little longer I will soon be moving Runamuk and my family HOME. Check back soon for details regarding our upcoming Farm-Warming Party!!!

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